Radio/Audio

I love writing for radio (nowadaways, we just call it audio, because people tend to listen via their computers). Writing good audio drama is an interesting blend of playwriting and screenwriting and fiction writing. I like trying to write scripts that only work well as audio plays, trying to make full use of sound and imagery. In some ways, radio is the most freeing of dramatic mediums, because we can create images in the listener’s mind that far outstrip what we can produce on stage or film.

Here are short summaries of my radio plays, sample pages from the scripts, and also links that will allow you listen to some of the productions they’ve received. I hope you enjoy them.

Christmas Breaks
Romantic Comedy. 12 minutes. 2m, 1w.
A woman tries to deal with being dumped by her boyfriend and the replacement that he found for himself through the personal ads. This has been a super fun, very popular Christmas show in theatres across the country, and now I’ve done a radio adaptation for Playing on Air.
Broadcast by :

I Am Not Invisible
Drama. 5 minutes. 1m.
I wrote this one for the 2010 Emerging America Festival, that was put on by the Huntington Theatre, the American Repertory Theatre, and the Institute for Contemporary Art. They asked a bunch of Huntington Playwriting Fellows to write short, site-specific audio plays. The intention was to have them be listened to via cell phone. This one is mine. (We were limited in our production capabilities and our casting–we had to performt them ourselves.)

This script was intended to be listened to on the brick plaza in front of the Boston Center for the Arts.
Summary: Maybe you should pay more attention to the people behind you in the supermarket. You might have ignored and pissed off the wrong man, someone who has chosen to creep closer. Much closer.
Broadcast by :

Another Brick in the Walk
Comedy. 5 minutes. 3m.
I wrote this one for the 2011 Emerging America Festival, put on by the Huntington Theatre, the American Repertory Theatre, and the Institute for Contemporary Art. Just as in 2010, they asked a bunch of Huntington Playwriting Fellows to write short, site-specific audio plays. (For my play, we were fortunate to have M. Bevin O’Gara direct and a fantastic cast of Robert P. Murphy, Ed Hoopman, and Paul Melendy.)

This script was intended to be listened to on the brick plaza in front of the Boston Center for the Arts.
Summary: Two longtime Boston residents engage a newcomer in a struggle of class, status, and clay masonry. You’ll never see bricks the same way again.
Broadcast by :

Love and Lightning.
Dark comedy. 27 minutes. 2m,1w
Stan and Teri are in the midst of a pleasant weekend bicycling across the prairie, when a storm suddenly appears and Stan is struck by lightning. He is left blind and paralyzed, with only Teri to help him. As she struggles to protect him from the storm, Teri discovers an engagement ring in Stan’s backpack. This is the moment she’s been waiting for! She’s perfectly willing to marry Stan, despite his infirmities. But inside the ring box is a rejection note from Stan’s girlfriend. To him, the whole trip with Teri was just a platonic excursion to get his mind off his troubles. Teri is not particularly understanding. She’s still willing to help Stan get to safety, but it’s going to cost him.

Read sample pages of the radio play version.
Brooklyn publishes a version for use on stage, but if you want to read the entire radio play, just email me.
Broadcast/Published by:

  • Brooklyn Publishers, 1999
  • Triangle Radio Theatre, Raleigh, NC, 1997
  • Shoestring Radio Theatre, San Francisco, 1996
  • Champaign-Urbana Radio Theatre, 1996
  • National Public Radio, 1993

icebox-tundraTundra Games.
Very dark comedy. 25 minutes. 2m,1w
Hickey is a professional killer cooped up in the middle of an arctic blizzard with his next target, Simon. But the bullets are at home, and they’re out of food. Hickey’s partner, Rose, shows up just in time, with ammunition and provisions, but Hickey has lost his nerve. Rose takes Simon out to finish the job. She returns and explains that rather than shooting Simon, she pushed him off the back of her snowmobile and left him to freeze. There’s just one problem-they have no proof to show their employers that they actually did the job. Rose thinks up a solution-they could use one of Hickey’s fingers (this might help atone for all the previous jobs he’s bungled). Needless to say, Hickey is not about to cut off his own finger, but Rose can be powerfully persuasive.

Read sample pages of the radio play version.
Brooklyn publishes a version for use on stage, but if you want to read the entire radio play, just email me. Broadcast/Published by:

Spitting Image
Comedy. 15 minutes. 2m,2w
Ed is a good-natured door-to-door doormat salesman ready for his annual dental checkup. He tries putting the moves on his beautiful dentist but discovers that he is the spitting image of her ex-husband. Multiple mishaps and sound effects guaranteed to make audiences grind their teeth. This one is super funny.

Read sample pages of the radio play version.
Brooklyn publishes a version for use on stage, but if you want to read the entire radio play, just email me.
Broadcast/Published by

  • Brooklyn Publishers, 1999
  • Champaign-Urbana Radio Theatre, 1996
  • KBUT/Chameleon Stage, Crested Butte, CO, 1993

icebox-windThe Wind and The Cold
Drama. 25 minutes. 2m,2w.
Pierre and Katrina drive up to his cabin in the Rocky Mountains for a peaceful weekend retreat. They arrive in a blizzard and discover that backpackers have stolen all the firewood. Pierre’s self-assured attempts to prove his mountaineering skills only manage to leave them stranded after he topples a tree on their Jeep. Katrina is hysterical with fear of the wind and the storm, and she rushes into the woods. As the two lovers attempt to find their way back to each other, they become caught in a romantic battle between the mystical forces of the Wind and the Cold.

Read sample pages
Broadcast by :

 

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